About the Journal

BORNEO EPIDEMIOLOGY JOURNAL (BEJ)

INTRODUCTION

There is an increasing demand for an exclusive journal to publish epidemiological studies rather than diluting the excellent write-ups in clinical journals. This journal is a fully open journal for the rapidly growing epidemiological studies. Authors will be given a new canvas for their work while maintaining standards and quality by being managed by respectable editors and reviewers who are matter experts in their field.

 

AIMS AND SCOPE

  • BEJ is devoted to the contribution covering applied, methodological and theoretical issues. This would include studies that use multidisciplinary or integrative methods. The journal aims to improve epidemiological knowledge and ultimately health worldwide.
  • Contributors include other disciplines that integrate epidemiology in their research including biostatistics, communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases, tropical diseases, environmental epidemiology, occupational health, rural health, health promotion, clinical epidemiology, public health policy and management.
  • BEJ only accept contributions in the English language.
  • Original Articles, Review Articles, Opinions, Perspectives, Mini Reviews and Case Reports are acceptable for submissions
  • BEJ is published twice a year.

Publication ethics – BORNEO EPIDEMIOLOGY JOURNAL

Ethical standards for publication exist to ensure high-quality scientific publications, public trust in scientific findings, and that people receive credit for their ideas. It is important to avoid:

Data fabrication and falsification

Plagiarism

Multiple submissions

Redundant publications (or ‘salami’ publications)

Improper author contribution or attribution

 

Data fabrication and falsification

Data fabrication means the researcher did not actually do the study but faked the data. Data falsification means the researcher did the experiment, but then changed some of the data.

 

Plagiarism

Taking the ideas and work of other scientists without giving them credit is unfair and dishonest. Copying even one sentence from someone else’s manuscript, or even one of your own that has previously been published, without proper citation is considered plagiarism—use your own words instead.

 

Multiple submissions

It is unethical to submit the same manuscript to more than one journal at the same time. Doing this wastes the time of editors and peer reviewers and can damage the reputation of the authors and the journals if published in more than one journal as the later publication will have to be retracted.

 

Redundant publications (or ‘salami’ publications):

This means publishing many very similar manuscripts based on the same experiment. Combining your results into one very robust paper is more likely to be of interest to a selective journal. Editors are likely to reject a weak paper that they suspect is a result of salami slicing.

 

Improper author contribution or attribution:

All listed authors must have made a significant scientific contribution to the research in the manuscript and approved all its claims. Don’t forget to list everyone who made a significant scientific contribution, including students and laboratory technicians. Do not “gift” authorship to those who did not contribute to the paper. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors has detailed guidelines on authorship that are useful for scientists in all fields: International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

Many journals have tools and processes in place to identify researchers that engage in unethical behaviour. If you are caught your manuscript may be rejected without review and your institution informed.

 

Corrections and retractions

When errors are identified in published articles, the publisher will consider what action is required and may consult the editors and the authors’ institution(s).

Errors by the authors may be corrected by a corrigendum and errors by the publisher by an erratum.

If there are errors that significantly affect the conclusions or there is evidence of misconduct, this may require retraction or an expression of concern following the COPE Retraction Guidelines.

All authors will be asked to agree to the content of the notice.

Conflicts of interest

Conflicts of interest (COIs, also known as ‘competing interests’) occur when issues outside research could be reasonably perceived to affect the neutrality or objectivity of the work or its assessment. This can happen at any stage in the research cycle, including during the experimentation phase, while a manuscript is being written, or during the process of turning a manuscript into a published article. 

Conflicts include the following:

  • Financial — funding and other payments, goods and services received or expected by the authors regarding the work or from an organization with an interest in the outcome of the work
  • Affiliations — being employed by, on the advisory board for, or a member of an organization with an interest in the outcome of the work
  • Intellectual property — patents or trademarks owned by someone or their organization
  • Personal — friends, family, relationships, and other close personal connections
  • Ideology — beliefs or activism, for example, political or religious, relevant to the work
  • Academic — competitors or someone whose work is critiqued

 

 

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